Academic Rank:
Clinical Associate Professor, UBC
Pediatric and Perinatal Pathologist, BCCH
Division Head, Anatomical Pathology, BCCH
Affiliation(s):
BCCH/BCCHRI
Short Bio:

Dr. Terry is a pediatric and perinatal pathologist at BC Children’s and Women’s Hospitals where he is the Anatomical Pathology Division Head, an Investigator in the Healthy Starts Theme at the BC Children’s Hospital Research Institute, an Investigator at the Women’s Hospital Research Institute, and a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at UBC.

Academic background

  • PhD Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC. 2008
  • MD University of Calgary, 2003
  • MSc Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, 1999
  • BSc with Hons Microbiology and Genetics University of Alberta, 1997

Research Interest

  • Chronic placental inflammation
  • Amniotic fluid infection
  • SIDS
  • Inflammatory bowel disease

My PubMed bibliography link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/16ORp1I9cik/bibliography/public/.

Teaching Interest

Dr. Terry is involved in teaching medical students, medical genetics students, residents, and fellows and is involved in graduate student education including acting as a course co-coordinator for PATH 535/635.

Current projects in my lab include:

I am working towards identifying biomarkers for early diagnosis of placental abnormalities such as amniotic fluid infection/inflammation and preeclampsia. I am interested in chronic placental inflammatory conditions including the pathogenesis of chronic intervillositis of unknown etiology.

The role of bacterial triggers in the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease is another area of interest and I am presently working on identification of potential trigger organisms and their association with granulomatous inflammation inflammatory signaling.

More recently I have been working on the potential associations of various early live developmental processes and increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome.