Academic Rank:
Professor
Vancouver General Hospital, Provincial Toxicology Centre
Affiliation(s):
VGH/VCHRI
Short Bio:

Dr. Schreiber is a consultant pathologist at Vancouver General Hospital with service responsibilities in the broad area of clinical chemistry. He is also medical director of the Provincial Toxicology Center, which provides both forensic and clinical toxicology services for the province of British Columbia.

Since joining the faculty at UBC, he has committed a large part of his career to the education of medical students, residents and colleagues. He directed the medical biochemistry residency program for 10 years and served as associate dean for undergraduate education at UBC from 1999-2002. He has received a number of teaching awards from students and peers, as well as recognition from professional organizations for contributions to continuing medical education.

Dr. Schreiber is currently president of the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), the largest pathology organization in North America.

Academic background

  • BA, Oberlin College, 1975
  • MD, Baylor College of Medicine, 1979
  • Residency & Research Fellowship, University of Washington, 1979-1984
  • Diplomate, American Board of Pathology, 1985

Awards and Recognition

  • Medical Undergraduate Society Teaching Excellence Award – 1989, 1992, 1993, 1997
  • The University of British Columbia Teaching Prize – 1994
  • 3M Teaching Fellowship – 1996
  • Outstanding Speaker Award, American Association for Clinical Chemistry – 1996, 1997, 2009
  • Education Excellence Award, Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists – 1998
  • Honorary Alumnus Award, UBC Alumni Association, Medical Division – 1998
  • CCE Distinguished Service Award, American Society of Clinical Pathologists – 1999
  • Distinguished Service to CME/CPD Award, UBC Faculty of Medicine – 2009

Research Interest

  • Diseases of porphyrin metabolism
  • Clinical and forensic toxicology

I have a longstanding interest in diseases of porphyrin metabolism and their diagnosis.  In the past, our laboratory has developed improved biochemical tests for porphyrins and their precursors in human samples.  We have also applied the techniques of molecular biology to characterize mutations that cause acute intermittent porphyria and hereditary coproporphyria.

Teaching Interest

Teaching students and residents is an essential part of my work.  I am especially interested in using technology to make learning easier and more relevant.

With the rise in popularity of smartphones and tablet computers, we have developed several applications (apps) that support mobile learning in pathology and laboratory medicine.  Our first app, called LabDx, provides information on more than 200 laboratory tests.  The program was piloted and evaluated by 3rd year medical students on the internal medicine clerkship.   Since then, we have developed two more apps, Medical Microbiology and Cytogenetics.