Academic Rank:
Clinical Assistant Professor, UBC
Associate Director, Immunology at Vancouver General Hospital
Affiliation(s):
Vancouver General Hospital
Short Bio:

I obtained my BSc in Medical Laboratory Science at the University of Alberta and my PhD in Immunology at Boston University School of Medicine. My thesis research focused on the mechanisms by which ubiquitous environmental pollutants suppress B lymphocyte function. I began my post-doctoral training at UBC (BRC) in Dr. John Schrader’s lab, my project focused on characterizing human monoclonal auto-antibodies to the cytokine GM-CSG with the aim of understanding the mechanisms that govern humoral immune responses as well as generating antibodies that may be used therapeutically. I later joined Dr. Peter van den Elzen’s laboratory at CFRI. I worked on identifying lipids that can be presented by B cells to NKT cells in order to boost immune responses. Such lipids can potentially be utilized as vaccine adjuvants. From I was a fellow in the Immunology laboratory at VGH where I worked towards becoming an ASHI-credentialed Director. I was involved in developing new clinical assays such HLA typing by next generation sequencing.  Currently I am Associate Director, Vancouver Coastal Health and Clinical Assistant Professor, Dept of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, UBC.

Academic background

  • University of Alberta, BSc, Medical Laboratory Science (With Distinction and Honors in Research), Sept 1991 – Apr 1996
  • Boston University School of Medicine, PhD, Microbiology, Program in Immunology, July 2000 – Dec 2005

Publications

Research Interest

  • Cell Biology
  • Immunity
    Immunology of Infectious Diseases
  • Apoptosis
  • Adaptive Immunity

Teaching Interest

I have contributed to many forms of teaching, including lecturing and facilitating class learning and discussion at the undergraduate and graduate levels as well as laboratory instruction in the undergraduate medical and dental program. I also actively supervise undergraduates, graduates and postdoctoral fellows in my own laboratory. Together with my supervisor, I have developed two new courses.

  • PATH 711 consists of 30 educational hours in Molecular and Clinical Immunology. It is developed specifically for residents, fellows, graduate students and clinicians, and is made available to both clinical and basic science departments. Course content, consisting of formal lectures and laboratory supervision, is condensed within an intensive week of study once per year. Formal lectures cover the areas of innate and adaptive immunity, transplantation, immune monitoring, autoimmune disease and emerging developments in clinical genomics and proteomics, while the laboratory components include serology, molecular immunology, antibody detection and an introduction to gene sequencing. I have received excellent evaluations from all the students in the course.
  • PATH 700 consists of 30 educational hours with specific focus on Immunogenetics and Histocompatibility. It is developed specifically for residents and fellows, and is made available primarily to clinical departments including Hematology, Nephrology, Solid Organ Transplantation, Immunology, Pediatrics, Pathology and others. Course content, consisting of formal lectures and laboratory supervision, is condensed within an intensive month of study and is provided approximately 10 months per academic year. Formal lectures cover the areas of clinical immunity, transplantation, immunogenetics, HLA and histocompatibility, while the laboratory components include serology, molecular immunology, antibody detection and an introduction to gene sequencing. I have again received excellent evaluations from all the students in the course.

My aim is to create exciting and easy to follow lectures, seminars and tutorials that provide the background for understanding modern advances in biomedical sciences and methodology. I strongly believe that for students to succeed in biomedical and clinical sciences, they must be introduced into an interdisciplinary approach in order to learn critical thinking. I also continue to rely on student feedback to continue to improve my teaching lectures and style.