Academic Rank:
Professor, UBC
Research Centre: Centre for Heart Lung Innovation (HLI)
ICORD (International Collaboration On Repair Discoveries)
Affiliation(s):
Short Bio:

Affiliations with Organizations:

  • BC Professional Firefighters’ Burn and Wound Healing Research Laboratory
  • Centre for Drug Research and Development UBC Centre for Heart Lung
  • Innovation UBC Department of Pathology UBC Department of Surgery
  • viDA Therapeutics, Inc

Dr. David Granville is a Professor at the Institute for Heart +Lung Health at St. Paul’s Hospital, UBC. Dr. Granville completed his B.Sc. at Simon Fraser University followed by a Ph.D. in Experimental Pathology at the University of British Columbia. Prior to his tenure at UBC, Dr. Granville worked at QLT, Inc. (www.qltinc.com) in the Immunology and Cell Biology division of the Preclinical Pharmacology Department (1994-2001). His preclinical work at QLT was focused on understanding the mechanism of action by which the light activated drug, verteporfin (aka Visudyne®) accumulates in, and kills cells and abnormal blood vessels in the treatment of diseases such as cancer and age related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. In 1999 Visudyne® was approved by the FDA for the treatment of macular degeneration resulting in the largest ophthalmic product release in history (as of 2001). In 2001, Dr. Granville moved to the Scripps Research Institute (La Jolla, CA) to study the role of oxidative stress, cytochromes p450 and cell death in ischemic heart injury. Dr. Granville’s research at Scripps with Dr. Roberta Gottlieb revealed a novel therapeutic target which, when inhibited, reduced the amount of heart injury caused by heart attacks by up to 60%. Dr. Granville is a primary inventor on a patent pertaining to the latter discoveries which was pertinent in the formation of Radical Therapeutix Inc. (www.radicaltherapeutix.com), an early stage spin-off company that is still in existence and located in San Diego, CA.

Dr. Granville was recruited back to UBC in May, 2003 as a Tier II Canada Research Chair. Dr. Granville was also awarded a Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research Scholar Award and in 2005 was awarded a Canada Top 40 Under 40™ award by Caldwell and Partners. He also received the 2006 UBC Outstanding Young Alumnus Award, the 2007 SFU Academic Alumnus Award, the 2008 Canadian Association Junior Scientist Award, 2010 Business in Vancouver Top Forty Under 40 Award and was a runner-up for the 2007 Louis and Arnold Katz Basic Science Prize at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. His research at the Institute for Heart + Lung Health, St. Paul’s Hospital is focused on a family of protein-degrading enzymes known as Granzymes (Granule-secreted enzymes) (www.granzymes.com). His research has revealed a novel role for these enzymes in aging and inflammation. He is currently taking this research to the next level with respect to translating these discoveries into the development of novel first-in-class therapeutics. He is also a Founder and Chief Scientific Officer of Vida Therapeutics, Inc. (www.vidatherapeutics.com).

Academic background

  • PDF, The Scripps Research Institute, Molecular and Experimental Medicine. 2003
  • PhD, The University of British Columbia, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. 2001
  • BSc, Simon Fraser University, Biological Sciences. 1994

Awards and Recognition

Awards for Teaching

  • World Association of Co-Operative Education Award, 2012 World Association of Co-Operative Education Award. Nominated by Simon Fraser University President and Vice Chancellor Dr. Andrew Petter. 2012

Other Awards

  • 2009 BIV Forty Under 40 Award, Business in Vancouver, Vancouver, BC. Jan 28, 2010
  • Canadian Association of Pathologists Junior Scientist Award, Canadian Association of Pathologists, Ottawa, ON. Jul 14, 2008
  • 2007 Outstanding Alumni Award for Academic Achievement, Simon Fraser University. Feb 2008
  • American Heart Association Scientific Sessions Finalist – Louis N and Arnold M Katz Basic Science Research Prize. Nov 2007
  • Outstanding Young Alumnus Award, University of British Columbia. Nov 2, 2006
  • Young Investigator Merit Award, American Heart Association Council on Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, ($500). Nov 2006
  • Wilbert J. Keon Award for Basic Science, CIHR Institute of Circulatory and Respiratory Health Young Investigator Forum, Finalist ($1500).  May 2006
  • Young Investigator Award, Canadian Stroke Network, ($1500), May 2006
  • “Wall of Fame” Inductee, Terry Fox Senior Secondary School. May 31, 2006
  • Researcher of the Month, Heart and Stroke Foundation. Mar 2006
  • Canada Top 40 Under 40 Award, Caldwell Partners. May 2005
  • Wilbert J. Keon Award for Basic Science, CIHR Institute of Circulatory and Respiratory Health Young Investigator Forum, Finalist ($1500). Apr 2005
  • CIHR III Travel Award, CIHR Institute of Infection and Immunity Young Investigator Forum. Apr 2005
  • Young Investigator Award, Canadian Society of Transplantation, ($1500). May 2004
  • Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research Scholar, Career investigator award, Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research, 2003-2008
  • Tier II Canada Research Chair in Cardiovascular Biochemistry, Career investigator award, Canada Research Chairs/CIHR. 2003-2008
  • Outstanding Oral Presentation, The Scripps Research Institute Society of Fellows Fall Research Symposium. Oct 25, 2002
  • Post-Doctoral Fellowship, Canada Institutes of Health Research. 2001-2004
  • Knowledge Network Documentary “Generation High Tech”, Knowledge Network Television. 1999-2001
  • Research Traineeship, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. 1997-2000
  • Independent Order of Foresters Scholarship, Foresters Insurance Company. 1989-1994
  • Canada Scholarship, Canadian Federal Government. 1989-1992
  • British Columbia Provincial Government Scholarship, BC Provincial Government. 1989
  • British Columbia Telephone Company Dependents Scholarship, BC Tel. 1989
  • Royal Canadian Legion (Branch 133) Scholarship, Royal Canadian Legion. 1989

Publications

  • Marchant D, Bellac C, Moraes TJ, Wadsworth S, Dufour A, Butler GS, Bilawchuk L, Hendry R, Robertson G, Cheung C, Ng J, Ang L, Luo Z, Heilbron K, Norris M, Duan W, Bucyk, Karpov A, Devel L, Georgiadis D, Hegele RG, Luo H, Granville DJ, Dive V, McManus BM, Overall CM. Transcriptional role of moonlighting MMP12 in antiviral immunity. Nature Med. 2014; 20(5):493-502. CA.
  • Hendel A, Hsu I, Granville DJ. Granzyme B Releases Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor from Extracellular Matrix and Induces Vascular Permeability. Lab. Invest. 2014: 94(7):716-25. SA.
  • Hsu I, Parkinson LG, Shen Y, Toro A, Brown T, Zhao H, Bleackley RC, Granville DJ. Serpina3n Accelerates Tissue Repair in a Diabetic Mouse Model of Delayed Wound Healing. Cell Death Differ. (In press). SA. 2014
  • Parkinson LG, Toro A, Brown K, Tebbutt SJ, Granville DJ. Granzyme B mediates both direct and indirect cleavage of extracellular matrix in skin after chronic low-dose ultra-violet light irradiation. Aging Cell. (In revision) SA. 2014
  • Hiebert PR, Boivin WA, Zhao H, McManus BM, Granville DJ. Perforin and Granzyme B Have Separate and Distinct Roles during Atherosclerotic Plaque Development in Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice. PLoS One. 2013 Oct 24;8(10):e78939.
  • Hirota JA, Hiebert PR, Gold M, Wu D, Graydon C, Smith JA, Ask K, McNagny K, Granville DJ, Knight DA. Granzyme B deficiency exacerbates lung inflammation in mice after acute lung injury. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2013 Sep;49(3):453-62.
  • Hiebert PR, Wu D, Granville DJ. Granzyme B degrades extracellular matrix and contributes to delayed wound contraction in Apolipoprotein E knockout mice. Cell Death Differ. 2013 20(10):1404-14. SA
  • Kim WD, Chi HS, Choe KH, Oh YM, Lee SD, Kim KR, Yoo KH, Ngan DA, Elliott WM, Granville DJ, Sin DD, Hogg JC. A possible role for CD8+ and non-CD8+ cell granzyme B in early small airway wall remodelling in centrilobular emphysema. Respirology. 2013 May;18(4):688-96.
  • Wang E, Chong K, Yu M, Akhoundsadegh N, Granville DJ, Shapiro J, McElwee KJ. Development of autoimmune hair loss disease alopecia areata is associated with cardiac dysfunction in C3H/HeJ mice. PLoS One. 2013 Apr 26;8(4):e62935.
  • Hendel A, Granville DJ. Granzyme B cleavage of fibronectin disrupts endothelial cell adhesion, migration and capillary tube formation. Matrix Biol. 2013 Jan;32(1):14-22.
Primary Research Area
Translational Research and/or Inflammation and Chronic Diseases
Secondary Research Area
Skin conditions
Cardiovascular and Pulmonary
Aging

Research Interest

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Dr. Granville’s research program over the past 20 years has been focused on mechanisms by which tissues are injured and identifying therapeutic targets that can be exploited to reduce injury and/or promote healing. His research is presently focused on how aging, immobility and diabetes affect tissue injury, inflammation and repair in different types of tissues. Dr. Granville has identified a family of serine proteases, known as Granzymes (Granule-secreted enzymes) that are elevated and contribute to the pathogenesis of conditions associated with impaired healing and inflammation, including autoimmune diseases (eg. multiple sclerosis, discoid lupus erythematosus), pressure/diabetic ulcers, spinal cord injury, cardiovascular, pulmonary and skin injury. In order to study granzymes in such a diverse set of indications, Dr. Granville has established an extensive network of clinical and scientific collaborators. He is currently taking this research to the next level with respect to translating his discoveries into the development and commercialization of novel, first-in-class therapeutics with the goal of entering the clinic by the end of 2017. Since arriving at UBC, his research has resulted in the filing of 30 patents, of which, all are owned by UBC and licensed to industry, and all include his UBC trainees as co-inventors. He is also the Scientific Founder and serves as the Chief Scientific Officer of the UBC spin-off company, viDA Therapeutics, Inc.

Dr. Granville is a Professor in the Pathology Laboratory of Medicine and a Principal Investigator in ICORD at UBC. He is the Associate Director of the BC Professional Firefighters’ Burn and Wound Healing Research Laboratory. He obtained his Ph.D. in Experimental Pathology at UBC.

At ICORD, Dr. Granville’s team is expanding on the work they have done on pressure ulcers with the Rick Hansen Institute and will be applying their expertise in Granzymes to areas related to spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis, such as the role of Granzymes in neuronal damage and demyelination. He also has an established program investigating the role of granzymes in dermatological disorders and cardiovascular diseases.

Current projects in my lab include:

Although his laboratory is quite full at the moment, Dr. Granville is always on the lookout for talented, energetic and bright graduate students and post-doctoral fellows to join his team if funding is available. Please contact Dr. Granville with inquiries.